Growing up, there was one place to be after every holiday meal: my grandma’s kitchen table. It was a hub of activity and chatter that went far beyond divvying up leftovers and discussing who should get the last slice of pie. Stories were swapped, highballs were drunk, and cards were played. … Read More ⇒

If you are or have a hunter in your life you are fully aware that it is open rifle season for whitetail deer. You can tell by the early morning wake ups, and the many smells of hunting; the tang of gun cleaning solvents, the clean aroma of cover scents, (spray me so a deer won’t catch a whif… Read More ⇒

It has been a long time since we measured time by food. Strawberry season or apple season or hunting season is rarely how we express our place on a calendar. The upside is that we live in a mechanized world where almost any food is available 24/7, 365 days of the year. The down side is we va… Read More ⇒

A hillside of gold in the Old Town community of North Columbus, Ga., not only caught my eye but enticed me to get out of the car with my camera in hand. It was a hill planted with dozens of Winterberry hollies; and despite a fall season of high heat and drought, it was creating quite a show. Read More ⇒

It is that time of year when sunlight becomes a cherished commodity. It is dark and gloomy when I wake up and bleak and dreary when supper hits the table. I miss my sunshine. In fact, our bodies need sunshine for regulating sleep, balancing hormones and brain chemicals and creating vitamin D. Read More ⇒

It makes sense that dying trees have terminal bud scars. Sounds like an awful condition — my condolences. But the healthiest trees have them, too (terminal scars, not condolences). It’s a good thing, since terminal bud scars provide an excellent way to leaf through a tree’s health records go… Read More ⇒

When I’m standing outdoors in the depths of winter, I try to imagine what it’s like now, at the end of a hot summer. This isn’t to get the blood flowing in January — it’s a way of enduring the cold and reminding myself how much more bearable it is than the heat. Read More ⇒