LOS ANGELES — Academy Award-winning actress Geena Davis has listed her longtime home in Pacific Palisades for sale at $5.995 million.

Set on a tree-lined street, the Mediterranean-style house features curated spaces filled with calming hues and decorative accents. A sculptural fireplace flanked by picture windows is a focal point in the living room. Blue-tinted stonework creates visual interest in the updated chef’s kitchen.

Dark hardwood floors unify the living spaces, including the 5,146-square-foot home’s five bedrooms. The second-story primary suite includes dual bathrooms, a separate office/gym and a tiled fireplace.

French doors open to a trellis-topped patio and outdoor barbecue. Tiered garden planters, lawn and mature trees fill out the nearly half-acre of grounds.

Davis, 64, is known for her film roles in “Thelma & Louise” (1991) and “A League of Their Own” (1992). She received an Oscar for her supporting role in the 1988 film “The Accidental Tourist.” This year she received the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award from the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences for her work in promoting gender parity on screen.

Davis bought the property in 1994 for $495,000.

PLEASED TO PASS THE KEYS

Krysten Ritter has to be happy with her home sale in Hollywood Hills. The “Jessica Jones” star just passed her scenic hillside house on to a new owner for $1.384 million.

That’s about $90,000 more than the asking price and more than double what she paid for the place; the actress bought the home in 2013 for $655,000 from “Simpsons” voice actor Hank Azaria.

Ritter’s place packs in plenty of style, as modern updates mix with original details across the nearly 1,500-square-foot floor plan. A bright orange front door offsets the whitewashed exterior, leading into common spaces with beamed ceilings, built-ins and picture windows that take in city and canyon views.

A floor-to-ceiling fireplace anchors the living room, and the galley-style kitchen tacks on stone counters and a farmhouse sink. Elsewhere are two bedrooms with vaulted ceilings and two bathrooms with custom tile.

Outside, chic spaces include a small turf lawn and a deck with a swimming pool overlooking the city. A carport finishes off the property.

Ritter, 38, starred in “Breaking Bad” and “Don’t Trust the B — in Apartment 23” before landing the lead role in “Jessica Jones,” a Netflix series set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. She also sang and played guitar in the indie rock outfit Ex Vivian.

BLAST FROM THE PAST

The Beverly Hills home where actors Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston lived during their marriage has sold in an off-market deal for $32.5 million.

A stellar example of the Tudor style, the 12,000-square-foot home came up for sale last year at $56 million and was listed for $44.5 million in March before exiting the market.

Aniston and Pitt owned the house in the early 2000s, during which time they renovated and expanded the estate. They divorced in 2005 and sold the property the following year for $28 million, according to the Wallace Neff volume of “Master Architects of Southern California 1920-1940.”

Set on more than an acre of grounds, the grand two-story is full of character details. Half-timbering and white-painted brickwork give the house a timeless charm. Inside, there’s a rotunda entry, an updated kitchen, two wet bars and a screening room — the latter of which is an addition from Aniston and Pitt’s days. There are five bedrooms and 13 bathrooms.

Outside, the manicured grounds unfold in layers around a swimming pool. The lighted and sunken tennis court includes a pavilion with a guest suite.

Even before Aniston and Pitt, the Wallace Neff-designed house had a long history. Originally built for actors Fredric March and Florence Eldridge in 1934, it was later owned by Vanderbilt scion Shirley Burden. Heiress Wallis Annenberg is another former owner.

MAGIC IN THE MISSION STYLE

The longtime Claremont home of late contractor Wayne Cox, who helped build portions of Disneyland as well as the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, is on the market for $1.425 million.

A blend of the California Mission Revival and ranch styles, the split-level house was built by Cox in 1969 as his personal residence. A rustic clay-tile roof, exposed brickwork and overhanging eaves are among the exterior details. A courtyard with a tiled fountain sits off the entry.

The 3,735-square-foot floor plan features high ceilings with exposed beams, handcrafted wrought-iron fixtures and a paneled library/den. There are four bedrooms, four bathrooms and an eat-in kitchen. The lower level holds a game room.

Outside, a covered patio sits above a kidney-shaped swimming pool. Views from the more than third-of-an-acre site take in the city lights of the Pomona Valley.

Cox, while working for James I. Barnes Construction, led the expansion of Disneyland’s Tomorrowland and worked on projects such as the Matterhorn, the Submarine Voyage (now the Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage) and the Monorail. In addition to his work on the Crystal Cathedral, he also built buildings at the Claremont Colleges, the University of La Verne and Cal State Fullerton.

READY FOR OFFERS TO SPAWN

Screenwriter-producer David Giler, known for his work in the “Alien” film franchise, has put his longtime home in the Hollywood Hills on the market for $2.195 million.

The ranch-style home, built in 1963, sits on more than a third of an acre. Lush landscaping surrounds the property, which features a saltwater swimming pool, pergola-topped patios and a tropical lanai room. A gated courtyard sits off the front.

Inside, the single-story floor plan holds an eat-in kitchen, two brick fireplaces and a den with a bar. The primary suite expands to include an office and a sauna. Each of the living areas has access to the grounds.

Giler was a writer and co-producer for the original “Alien” (1979) and has worked as a writer or producer on the “Alien” sequels as well as the prequels “Prometheus” and “Alien: Covenant” and the spinoff “Alien vs. Predator” films. His other screenwriting credits include “Fun With Dick and Jane” (1977), “Southern Comfort” (1981) and “The Money Pit” (1986).

On the TV side, Giler was an executive producer for the cult horror anthology series “Tales From the Crypt” and “Tales From the Cryptkeeper.”

Tribune Wire

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