Hammond Farmers Market open for business beginning Wednesday

The Hammond Farmers’ and Artisans’ Market starts its season Wednesday. It will take place Wednesdays from 3 to 6 p.m., beginning on June 16 and ending Sept. 15, located at 14 Main St., in the center of Hammond on the “green” area next to the old Ned’s Store. Pictured are organizers Brooke Starke, left, and Lori Thistle at the 2020 market. Submitted photo

HAMMOND — A wide assortment of locally made and grown products will be on hand as the Hammond Farmers’ and Artisans’ Market starts its season Wednesday.

The market will take place Wednesdays from 3 to 6 p.m., beginning on June 16 and ending Sept. 15, located at 14 Main St., in the center of Hammond on the “green” area next to the old Ned’s Store.

Brooke Stark, an organizer of the market, said that products include seasonal garden produce, maple products, popcorn, coffee, homemade breads and jams, soaps and jewelry, handmade greeting cards, potted plants, hemp/CBD products, grass-fed meats, flavored cotton candy and a wide assortment of baked goods.

Stark said that farmers’ markets are designed to provide locally grown, healthy and nutritious produce to local communities. The Hammond market also includes a wide range of craft items that support local artists.

“We think people like to browse markets and chat with vendors and fellow patrons outdoors, enjoying the social aspect of markets that they don’t find in the grocery stores. Many of our patrons really like the idea of supporting local growers and knowing the food is right from the garden. Some vendors sell organic produce, and some pesticide-free but not certified,” Stark said.

Unlike many operations in 2020, the market did not close due to COVID-19, according to Stark.

“We were open, though a few regular vendors were not in attendance due to COVID concerns. We followed state protocols for the safety of our vendors and patrons. This will also happen in 2021. Masks will be required, and we have hand-washing stations and try to maintain distancing as best we can,” she said.

In 2020, the market had nine paying vendors. So far in 2021, the vendors include Circle G Farm, Ennisbrooke Farm, Radiant Gem/River House Soap, Card Creations, Guy Drake’s Plants, Grasse River Hemp/Northern Limits Farm, Raygan Farm, Angel Acres Farm, Granny’s Cotton Candy, Back to Baskets and Amish baked goods and produce with more expected to take part in the season, according to Stark.

There will be at least two tables with public service information.

Anyone who is interested in taking part in the Hammond Farmers’ and Artisans’ Market can contact organizers at 315-324-5032, or visit their Facebook page.

“Even a small gardener or crafter can sell those extra items and enjoy a friendly atmosphere,” said Stark, “We are really hoping to find a wine vendor; we have had them in the past and they were quite successful, but we have not had one for the past two years.”

Stark said that the market accepts SNAP, FMNP checks, senior food checks, Double-Up Food Bucks and also accept cash, credit or debit since they work under the auspices of GardenShare of St. Lawrence County.

The fee for vendors is $50 for the season, but half will be returned to those vendors in the fall who have not missed more than one day per month. Non-profit or informational tables for free.

“We are not interested in making a profit, but in providing a service to the community. This is a small market, but big things are happening here,” she said.

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Johnson Newspapers 7.1

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