GRB spirit week kicks-off with Native American guest speaker

John Buck shows G. Ray Bodley High School students a wampum belt, as he explains its significance to the Haudenosaunee people during a recent presentation which kicked off the school’s spirit week.

FULTON - G. Ray Bodley High School (GRB) students and staff members recently kicked off their spirit Week as they welcomed guest speaker John Buck to share the local history related to Native American ties to the school and community.

Dressed in traditional Native American attire, which represented the Beaver Clan he belongs to, Buck shared that at one time the local land belongs to the Onondaga Nation people.

“The Iroquois was the name given to our people originally; it was the French who gave us the name but in our native language we are the Haudenosaunee- the people of the longhouse,” he said.

He then showcased a wampum belt, also known as the Hiawatha Belt, to symbolize the five nations and the tree of peace among the nations. Buck compared it to the Constitution of the United States to the Haudenosaunee people. He explained the various territories and reservations throughout the state, most information of which Fulton City School District fourth-graders will learn during an academic unit on Native Americans.

Several additional facts and tidbits were shared, including how the Native Americans gave the country the game of lacrosse.

Buck, the grandfather of GRB junior Sennayeawauss Clinard, said he was proud to share about his culture.

Johnson Newspapers 7.1

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.